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sides digging in. the colonel and the rebels. what if anything should the u.s. do now? >>> the latest singer to give back the gadhafi money. >>> the cold case cracked, the man who targeted women for more than a decade and the one simple move this week that got him caught. >>> made in america. thousands of you writing in from the firefighter's uniform to the kindergarten class to the discovery at the golden gate bridge. what all of you found. >>> good evening on this saturday. like clock work, the spike in twisters we see every year when we start the month of march returned in devastating force. one tearing through a louisiana town flipping a mail truck like a toy. snapping utility poles. the power is out tonight in more than 100 homes damaged. we've now learned of one death, a mother trying to save her child. the tornado is part of a massive storm system. there are flood warnings and watches in 20 states from the mississippi river to the hudson river. meteorologist chikage windler leads us off. >> reporter: three suspected tornados touched down within 15 minutes of each other in south
tapper, who starts us off at the white house, where the study was released just today. >> reporter: good evening, diane. the white house released today what it called the most comprehensive study by the government on women in almost 50 years. each day, 72 million women in the u.s. get up and either head to work or look for work. they're a group of women who are better educated than ever before. but they still make less than their male counterparts, on average, only 80% of what a man makes. this woman graduated with a masters from columbia and went to work for a magazine in new york city. her male counterpart with the same job and only a bachelor's degree was paid $3,000 a year more. >> i felt de-valued. i felt like i didn't count. i felt inferior to my colleague. >> reporter: sometimes it's discrimination, but there are other factors, as well, behind back inequity. >> one reason is they're not going into the kinds of fields that are high income producing. so the president has had an effort to encourage women and girls to go into science and technology and engineering math. >> reporter: w
perfume. but her humanitarian work may be her greatest legacy. using her fame, she raised millions for aids research, standing by rock hudson, one of its first victims, when others shunned him. to the public, she may have been the last great movie star. but for those who knew her, she was also a loving mother and loyal friend. >> there have been so many lessons, life and death lessons, emotional lessons. i don't believe in regrets. and i have no idea what's going to happen tomorrow, no one does. >> and barbara walters is here now. we were saying earlier, we don't think of her as a pioneer, but her sheer fearlessness about her own choices in life changed things in this country. >> reporter: absolutely. by the way, she never wrote her all biography. this, all the different clips that people will see, that's her all biography. she was gutsy and salty and funny. look at what we talked about. married eight times, she wanted to get married, she married them. she wanted to divorce them, she divorced them. she jumped into aids when nobody did. she stood by people who were rejected. michael
of the skies. so what's next for u.s. forces and what will gadhafi do now? >>> radiation in food from japan. >> fukushima fresh vegetables. >> we do our own tests. >>> and an american family after ten days of hope learns their daughter was lost trying to save others. >>> men, women and jobs. which sex is getting 90% of the new jobs and why? >>> and sibling secrets. are you an older or younger sibling? news by which order gives you an edge in health and happiness. >>> good evening, as we come on the air tonight beginning this week together the united states is still in the middle of an international assault on moammar gadhafi's libya. but the battle is moving at breakneck speed. it is called "operation odyssey dawn" and as of tonight the skies are clear. gadhafi's forces have come to a halt though there are still big questions. how soon can the u.s. hand over the lead to other countries? who are these libyan rebels and are we even on the same side? and what is next? will gadhafi fold or could this go on for years? we have team coverage from washington to libya beginning with martha raddatz o
with secretary of state hillary clinton about the u.s. intervention in libya, how we got involved and how it will end. but we bring you a headline tonight. are there signs that colonel moammar gadhafi and those close to him may be trying to find an exit, even though gadhafi appeared on television, promising to win? also, as abc news has reported on "good morning america," libyan dip low malts say at least one of gadhafi's sons may now have been killed by a libyan pilot on a kamikaze mission so, here is what secretary clinton told us today about gadhafi and the report about his sons. there's a report that two of gadhafi's sons, at least one, but maybe two, have been killed. can you confirm this? >> well, i can't confirm it, but we've heard it. and we've heard a lot. >> reporter: credibly? >> well, we hear it from many different sources. and that's why i can't confirm it. i can't give confirmation because, you know, the evidence is not sufficient. but we've heard that. we heard about other people close to him reaching out to people that they know around the world, africa, the middle east, e
for the u.s. to hand over a huge part of that bold operation over libya. and tonight, an abc news exclusive. martha raddatz with extraordinary access. behind me, you're looking at the "usskearsarge." martha spending hours on board with the american commander. tonight, the latest on these new u.s. plans to hand over partial control and she has ne details about the rescue of those u.s. pilots ejecting from 22,000 feet and tough questions for the commander. will this operation be a success in the end? martha landed back at a u.s. base in italy just a short time ago and has the latest. >> reporter: good evening, david. there are a lot of details to be worked out about that nato plan, but we did spend a remarkable day jumping from warship to warship with the man currently in charge. general carter ham took charge of africa command on march 9th. ten days later, he was at war. and now, he is here, in the middle of the fight, touring the u.s. warships off the coast in libya. he brought the sailors and marines some encouragement from their commander in chief -- >> he said, how are the attacks going?
. >>> good morning, again, everyone. thanks for spending the week with us. it's been good having david muir here with us. we're going to get to japan in a moment. >> so much news this morning. >>> we're also tracking a story we broke at abc news. an air traffic controller sleeping on the job at a major airport, while two planes were landing. this morning, we learn how many airports rely on just one person to guide your plane in. >>> and did you hear this? elizabeth taylor late to her own funeral, by design. she wanted it that way. to be late to her own funeral. we have more details about her private service. actor colin farrell, joining family and friends. >> love that detail about her arriving late. >>> we're going to get to the breaking news this morning, what could be a catastrophic nuclear situation in japan. the prime minister speaking just moments ago about the new and perhaps the biggest breach yet in one of the nuclear reactor cores. neal karlinsky is tracking what the prime minister said moments ago. he has the latest from tokyo. neal, what did you hear? >> reporter: david, the pri
, she says, so it's hard for us to figure out what's going on. i wish they would explain it to us. living in a shelter far from home, the entire family passes the time making origami. more than 50 so far, because as the superstition goes, it takes 1,000 cranes to make a wish. what will that wish be? his answer? we want to go back to our normal lives again. hard to imagine things getting back to normal anytime soon. about the only thing certain today about japan's nuclear emergency is that the things don't seem to be getting any better. dan? >> they do not. neal karlinsky, thank you. >>> we have pair of experts here to walk us through all they all that this means. michio kaku and joe cirincione. to have water at 10 million times higher than normal in terms of its radiation levels, can you tell us how dangerous that is? >> a dangerous, even scary level of radiation. near lethal amounts of radiation. it mean that for the first time, we have a direct pathway between the hot uranium core and the outside environment in unit two. a breach of containment in possible units three and unit t
? >> at least she's coming out of the penalty to be with us. good morning, america. we have david muir with us, as george continues to take time off. you know what we're going to do this morning? we're going to celebrate elizabeth taylor's life. and our colleague, barbara walters, shares her memories of the icon. and we'll have a look at her jaw-dropping jewels. and the men in her life that lavished her with those jewels. >>> also coming up in this first half hour, what critics are calling a political stunt. this is out of japan this morning. tokyo's governor downing a glass of tap water, just 24 hours after that water was called radioactive. can it really shift this quickly? >>> we're going to start with the wild weather overnight all across the country. sam will have the forecast in a moment. but first, matt gutman joins us from westmoreland county, pennsylvania. >> reporter: good morning. this is a roof tile. that's the only part of this roof that's left. in 15 seconds of terror, residents here tell me that the entire neighborhood was shaking. porches up off the street. houses like this, ma
a little time off. good to have david muir back with us this morning. >> great to be here, robin. breaking news on the f-15, coming in this morning. >> in libya, on the third day of air strikes this morning. we're not sure where the pilot is this morning. but the other pilot is safe. this is coming in right now. developments are coming in. we'll keep you up-to-date. and more on one of gadhafi's sons died after a libyan pilot made a suicide attack. >>> and brian ross is here with an eye-opening look at where gadhafi might be. we'll show you the deep, underground tunnels, the elaborate hideaway where's the libyan leader might be hiding. >>> we want to get to martha raddatz in washington this morning, that's covering the f-15, that's gone down. we have the pictures coming in. what do we know this morning about the two pilots? >> reporter: well, we believe that both the members of the air crew are safe. the pilot and the weapons system officer. that's the officer who sits in the back. one of them has been recovered with minor injuries. the other, is recovery is in process right now. this went
elizabeth taylor. >>> good morning, everyone. thanks for being with us today. the first week of spring has come in with a bang, hitting some big chunks of the country, with everything from tornados to even heavy snow. >> in fact, one twister touched down in northern california last night. it damaged a half-dozen homes along a path that stretched at least a mile long. as the state braces for more nasty weather, cleanup continues in the east, after severe storms rip through pennsylvania. we get the latest from brad wheelis. >> reporter: neighborhoods in suburban pittsburgh were blown apart by a powerful tornado. at least 40 homes and a school in hempfield were damaged, moments after last night's funnel cloud sighting. >> i was scared to death. with my wife and kids. we were just scared to death. >> reporter: a similar scene of destruction in nebraska and iowa. >> all you could see was debris flying around. >> reporter: the twisters hit rural areas between omaha and sioux city. >> the garage just went boom. >> reporter: property owners wasted no time rebuilding. floodwaters are rising in sout
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11